Florida Firearm Bill of Sale Form

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Updated July 01, 2022

A Florida firearm bill of sale is a legal document that proves a firearm was sold and purchased or traded and is changing ownership in the State of Florida. This document requires notarization, therefore all signatures should be withheld until all parties are in the presence of a notary public and have been identified and witnessed. Florida has a waiting period of three (3) days between the sale and delivery of all types of firearms. Holders of concealed weapons permits are not subject to the waiting period.

Table of Contents

Privately Selling a Firearm

Only a properly licensed importer, manufacturer, or dealer can complete the sale of a firearm in Florida, as outlined in Fla. Stat. §790.065.

Prohibited from Buying

According to Fla. Stat. § 790.23 is considered illegal to own a firearm for any individual who has been:

  • Convicted of a felony in the courts of this state;
  • Found, in the courts of this state, to have committed a delinquent act that would be a felony if committed by an adult and such person is under 24 years of age;
  • Convicted of or found to have committed a crime against the United States which is designated as a felony;
  • Found to have committed a delinquent act in another state, territory, or country that would be a felony if committed by an adult and which was punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding 1 year and such person is under 24 years of age; or
  • Found guilty of an offense that is a felony in another state, territory, or country and which was punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding 1 year.

Additionally, Fla. Stat. § 790.233(1) states that: 

  • A person may not have in his or her care, custody, possession, or control any firearm or ammunition if the person has been issued a final injunction that is currently in force and effect, restraining that person from committing acts of domestic violence, as issued under §741.30 or from committing acts of stalking or cyberstalking, as issued under §784.0485,

And Fla. Stat. § 790.235. Determines that:

  • Any person who meets the violent career criminal criteria under §775.084(1)(d), regardless of whether such person is or has previously been sentenced as a violent career criminal, who owns or has in his or her care, custody, possession, or control any firearm, ammunition, or electric weapon or device, or carries a concealed weapon, including a tear gas gun or chemical weapon or device, commits a felony of the first degree, punishable as provided in §775.082, §775.083, or §775.084. A person convicted of a violation of this section shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum of 15 years’ imprisonment; however, if the person would be sentenced to a longer term of imprisonment under §775.084(4)(d), the person must be sentenced under that provision. A person convicted of a violation of this section is not eligible for any form of discretionary early release, other than pardon, executive clemency, or conditional medical release under §947.149.

Furthermore, Fla. Stat. § 790.064(1) confirms that:

  • A person who has been adjudicated mentally defective or who has been committed to a mental institution, as those terms are defined in §790.065(2), may not own a firearm or possess a firearm until relief from the firearm possession and firearm ownership disability is obtained.

Registering a Firearm

Fla. Stat. §790.335(2) states that registration of firearms by a governmental agency is prohibited in the state of Florida.

Concealed Carry

Concealed carry is allowed in Florida only with a proper Florida Concealed Weapon or Firearm License.

How to Apply

A person must be at least twenty-one (21) years old, a U.S. citizen, free of physical infirmities that would prevent the safe handling of a firearm, and free of an addiction or chronic use of controlled substances in order to apply for a concealed carry permit.

Step 1 – Complete the Concealed Weapon or Firearm License Application, or complete the online application.

Step 2 – Attach a color photograph that was taken within the past thirty (30) days.

Step 3 – Attach proof of competency with a firearm as outlined in Fla. Stat. §790.06(2)(h).

Step 4 – Attach a full set of fingerprints as explained in Fla. Stat. §790.06(5)(c).

Step 5 – Submit to a background check as required by Fla. Const. art. 8 §5(b).

Step 6 – Submit the application to the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

Step 7 – Pay the appropriate licensing fee.

Step 8 – The DACS will issue or deny the application within ninety (90) days of submission.

Reciprocity

In accordance with Fla. Stat. §790.015, a nonresident of Florida can carry a concealed weapon if they are at least twenty-one (21) years old, has a concealed carry permit from their state of residence, and is a U.S. permanent resident.

Residents from the following states either don’t have access to concealed carry permits or their permits are not recognized by the state of Florida: California, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.